The frequency of herbal and dietary supplement mislabeling

At The Liver Meeting, hosted by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, researchers said herbal and dietary supplement mislabeling is common and should be regarded as a potential cause for liver damage. More than 20% of cases of liver injury reported to the U.S.

At The Liver Meeting, hosted by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, researchers said herbal and dietary supplement mislabeling is common and should be regarded as a potential cause for liver damage. More than 20% of cases of liver injury reported to the U.S. Drug Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN) are attributed to herbal and dietary supplements. "Since herbal and dietary supplements are not required by the FDA to be tested for safety or effectiveness, the DILIN has focused on various factors that could explain their potential for harm," said Victor Navarro, MD, chair of Hepatology for Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. His team of researchers used samples of herbal and dietary supplements collected by DILIN to analyze the contents of these products to determine the frequency of mislabeling, finding that just 90 of 203 products contained labels that accurately reflected their contents. Mislabeling—when the chemical analysis did not confirm the ingredients listed on the label—occurred in 80% of products used for body building and performance enhancement and 72% of weight-related products. "Based on these findings, the DILIN will embark upon a more detailed analysis of the chemical ingredients, to determine the precise cause of the liver injury," he said.