Pharmacists help patients with hypertension

Research conducted by the University of Iowa and funded by the National Institutes of Health found that patients with uncontrolled hypertension have better blood-pressure control when treated by care teams that include pharmacists.

Research conducted by the University of Iowa and funded by the National Institutes of Health found that patients with uncontrolled hypertension have better blood-pressure control when treated by care teams that include pharmacists. The results come from two studies, one published this month in the Journal of the American Society of Hypertension. Researchers enrolled 625 racially diverse patients with uncontrolled hypertension in 15 states. Investigators evaluated how well patients could control their blood pressure when receiving care from a medical team with a pharmacist compared with a physician alone. Pharmacists in the study were embedded in the medical office and had long-standing relationships with the physicians. Patients with a medical team showed a systolic blood pressure drop of 6.1 mmHg after 9 months, which can reduce the chances of death by stroke by 23%. Patients in the pharmacist-included care teams also had their medications adjusted an average of 4.9 times during the study period.