Shortened I.V. antibiotic course for uncomplicated, late-onset group B streptococcal bacteremia

Researchers wondered how often shorter courses of I.V. antibiotics are used instead of the standard 10-day treatment for babies with uncomplicated, late-onset group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteremia and whether they are effective.

Researchers wondered how often shorter courses of I.V. antibiotics are used instead of the standard 10-day treatment for babies with uncomplicated, late-onset group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteremia and whether they are effective. The team used the Pediatric Health Information System database to identify 775 infants aged 7 days to 4 months who were hospitalized with GBS bacteremia during 2000–15. Nearly 80% of the patients were given a prolonged I.V. course of antibiotics, with about 20% undergoing shortened therapy as denoted by discharge after 8 days without a peripherally inserted central catheter charge. The rate of GBS recurrence was 2.3% for babies receiving prolonged therapy and 1.8% for those under the abbreviated regimen. The results of the retrospective cohort study indicate that it is not unusual for providers to prescribe shortened I.V. antibiotic courses in the setting of pediatric GBS bacteremia, with low rates of disease recurrence.